Marketing and Communities

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Marketing and Communities

GodlyPerfection
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This post was updated on .

Lesson 24: Advertising
Lesson 25: Investment
Lesson 26: Nurturing
Lesson 27: Reputation
Lesson 49: Exposure


Another late one, but most people have read these as well. These are all relatively short so don't worry. They are from my own written series the "Forge Lessons" a series used at a couple colleges and high schools to teach game/level design and have been featured on several sites. They all touch on pretty much the same issue... getting people to like you and getting your name and content out there. This is probably one of the most directly helpful resources that will help you stand above the rest of the competition if you take it to heart. Now's the perfect time to start making friends and being a politician. Send friend requests, reply to pre-pro threads, and just hang out with everyone. Remember sincerity is important, most people here are smart enough to know if you are being fake just for a vote. In my eyes it is more valuable to help a friend improve their work and get their support than to try to not help them and hope they do worse because of it.

Here is a question that can help get your reply started:

- How many friends do you have in this competition and how many of your friends haven't yet joined?
- What communities do you spend your time at?
- Do you actively consider time dedicated to help others and leave a lasting impression that you do care?



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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

Valiant Outcast
This has been a problem area for me. I do not currently have high speed internet, limiting me to online play only while hanging out with friends (but I am getting it next week in my new apartment). I don't have a computer (all this is done on my fancy work phone, but I plan to get one rather soon) so I have never been a part of a forge community. The closest I have come was being a part of KSI
(Which I do not recommend. Too much false government for my taste) as head of my group's forge team. The only real exposure that my maps have had was a few custom games with friends once in a while, and those grew less common as Halo Reach grew older.

Hopefully I will make a few friends here and get back to those days when people actually played custom games.
I am neither the Judge or His jury; only His witness.
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

AtlasisShruggin
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
The community aspect of advertising a map and exposing it to others in an art in and of itself, but really only requires a few things in my experience. Stay active in the community, get your name and work out there.

Build up a reputation that makes forgers and competitive player want to test and play your maps. This is also fairly simple to do in my opinion. Listen to advice and take it, let the testers feel and know that they will make an impact on the final map. Giving them a sense of investment will keep them coming back again and again. You'll most likely improve your map along the way too.

Finally, just be a good guy. Help others out in a respectful manner and they will most likely return the favor. Don't dominate a lobby, allow others to test their maps and give them advice. Doing this will also get them in the mindset of giving quality critiques.

Finally engage a person, don't just answer them and end the discussion. When you make a response a conversation a player is going to enjoy his time a lot more than when his advice is being taken on a whim. Ask them why they think it needs to be changed. How they would change it.

I've found this creates a snow ball effect as well. As you take advice, not only does your reputation improve, but your map skill will as well.

Of course everyone has there two cents to put in. You have to decide who to listen to and who not to. Personally, I usually don't enact and change until the player has tested the map with me. I don't trust advice unless I've seen how he plays the map and know he actually has a handle on the design. Be wary of the 'window shoppers' of the forging community. Many forgers think they can give sound advice by just looking at a screenshot... trust me you can't. There's exceptions to this rule, but usually only when there is a glaring problem with a map. This is usually a broad critique, such as there's a room with only one entrance. But even when a player complains about cover, they are rarely seeing it from a player perspective, just from an overhead screenshot. Invite them to a game and be polite, but bring the change from those who play and care about the success of your design.
"This dread born of risk is not the opposite of joy, or even of quiet activity and calm enjoyment. It transcends such oppositions and lives in secret communion with the serene and gentle yearnings of creativity."
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

deathxxrenegade
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
This is a slight challenge to me.  I have several friends on my friends list that are part of this particular forging community.  As for myself, this is the only place that I go (as of now).  Working has put a limit to the amount of time have available to me to forge. And unfortunatly, most of the people that I used to forge with usually get on at night......after I'm already in bed. For a while I haven't played Reach at all (close to 3 months) because of work. But now I am able to get on and I'm 'brushing up' on both my general gameplay (So I have a chance to win some matches when/if I help test maps) and my forge creations.
To command the past you control the future. To command the future you conquer the past.    

Kane
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

Valiant Outcast
In reply to this post by AtlasisShruggin
AtlasisShruggin wrote
The community aspect of advertising a map and exposing it to others in an art in and of itself, but really only requires a few things in my experience. Stay active in the community, get your name and work out there.

Build up a reputation that makes forgers and competitive player want to test and play your maps. This is also fairly simple to do in my opinion. Listen to advice and take it, let the testers feel and know that they will make an impact on the final map. Giving them a sense of investment will keep them coming back again and again. You'll most likely improve your map along the way too.

Finally, just be a good guy. Help others out in a respectful manner and they will most likely return the favor. Don't dominate a lobby, allow others to test their maps and give them advice. Doing this will also get them in the mindset of giving quality critiques.

Finally engage a person, don't just answer them and end the discussion. When you make a response a conversation a player is going to enjoy his time a lot more than when his advice is being taken on a whim. Ask them why they think it needs to be changed. How they would change it.

I've found this creates a snow ball effect as well. As you take advice, not only does your reputation improve, but your map skill will as well.

Of course everyone has there two cents to put in. You have to decide who to listen to and who not to. Personally, I usually don't enact and change until the player has tested the map with me. I don't trust advice unless I've seen how he plays the map and know he actually has a handle on the design. Be wary of the 'window shoppers' of the forging community. Many forgers think they can give sound advice by just looking at a screenshot... trust me you can't. There's exceptions to this rule, but usually only when there is a glaring problem with a map. This is usually a broad critique, such as there's a room with only one entrance. But even when a player complains about cover, they are rarely seeing it from a player perspective, just from an overhead screenshot. Invite them to a game and be polite, but bring the change from those who play and care about the success of your design.
 why did you use "Finally" twice when neither of them were final?
I am neither the Judge or His jury; only His witness.
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

AtlasisShruggin
Valiant Outcast wrote
 why did you use "Finally" twice when neither of them were final?
This is an example of how not to build your reputation. This could be easily compared to a forger who comments on nothing but the aesthetics of a map from a screenshot they see online, rather than paying attention to design and giving quality feedback. Nitpicking grammar doesn't make me think of you as a superior intellect. It makes me find you annoying.

To answer your question, I used finally twice because I believed while writing that I was finishing my post with a final thought both times. I did not go back to edit my response. Satisfied?

FINALLY, next time you read a post, please pay attention to the substance of the writing, rather than the picking apart the grammar. Then we can ENGAGE in a conversation about the topic, and not worry about my use of vocabulary.
"This dread born of risk is not the opposite of joy, or even of quiet activity and calm enjoyment. It transcends such oppositions and lives in secret communion with the serene and gentle yearnings of creativity."
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

Valiant Outcast
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
Actually I had nothing against it.
It just struck me as funny.

If you were offended I apologize.
I am neither the Judge or His jury; only His witness.
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

GodlyPerfection
Administrator
In reply to this post by AtlasisShruggin
AtlasisShruggin wrote
Valiant Outcast wrote
 why did you use "Finally" twice when neither of them were final?
This is an example of how not to build your reputation. This could be easily compared to a forger who comments on nothing but the aesthetics of a map from a screenshot they see online, rather than paying attention to design and giving quality feedback. Nitpicking grammar doesn't make me think of you as a superior intellect. It makes me find you annoying.

To answer your question, I used finally twice because I believed while writing that I was finishing my post with a final thought both times. I did not go back to edit my response. Satisfied?

FINALLY, next time you read a post, please pay attention to the substance of the writing, rather than the picking apart the grammar. Then we can ENGAGE in a conversation about the topic, and not worry about my use of vocabulary.

But you see you are doing the same in return and nitpicking his response. Perhaps he was just curious. "It makes me find you annoying" is no way to build a rep either. Rather than being offended, it is crucial to reply in a way in which you act as if the person was just being curious rather than attacking you. It helps avoid needless arguing and offense. Because the kind of reaction displayed above is definitely not how you should ever respond. Always think twice about how you talk to people and how you would feel if you were to read a response like that from them.

Thank you Atlas for that fine demonstration. ;) This is an opportunity to learn from one another... take it as one. :)


Valiant Outcast wrote
Actually I had nothing against it.
It just struck me as funny.

If you were offended I apologize.
This is definitely a great example on how to reply to something after causing a ruckus rather than retaliating harshly. Well played Valiant. ;)


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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

Dr D04K
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
As others have mentioned, this aspect of forging is tough for me.  I try to be present on forums, which is the most convenient way of interacting with the community for me because its always on my schedule, but getting games has always been a challenge since I haven't really been able to schedule time to play, I just play when I've got a few spare minutes.  I've always found this the most frustrating aspect of map design as well since it really isn't about the quality of the work.  Unfortunately, its just the way the world works.  I'm hoping 343 does something like the star nameplate in Reachto recognize players who contributed to the game.  It was a badge of honor and symbol that this player was plugged in, at least before Bungie made it completely meaningless.
Gamer tag: "Dr D04K" (thats a zero and a four)
RP Portfolio
Maps:
Wishbone Alley
Dosado
Infinity Garden
Epicurean
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

LieutenantNasty
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
You join a 4 player match and are matched with people you have never seen before Newmoon87, Rick98, and LieutenantNasty. Now witch of the 3 would you most likely listen to and follow? Your gammertag itself is the first impression you will make on people. Over 7 years ago i join live just to play halo. When making my tag i wanted to show leadership, power, and style, thus LieutenantNasty was born. I have worked on my image from day one. I wanted people that I could count on so I showed them they could count on me. I wanted my team to show class and I lead by example. When I meet people they ether love or hate me and thats dertermined by witch team they are on or if there one of them forgers who can't stand seeing someones maps that other people like more then the ones they built. Even though I come off as conceded I treat people with respect. I always speak of being strong but never being stronger then the one next to me. Because of my image I have built a playgroup that I'm very found of.                                                                                     I speak to the individual not just the group, It is easy to get a mass of paople to show up but to get them to stay they need to know that you value them as a member of your team. I have invested a lot of time in training young players how to not just play but how to think and how to go about taking on new challenges in life. As far as helping people forge, one of the first things people ask when they play on my maps is "will you help me with my map?". I reply with show me what you got. I have tought many members of my playgroup the basic needs for good halo gameplay. Help people and it will be returned, but that not why I do it. Giving to my community is what I live for.                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Now advertising, the only time I realy applied advertising is when expanding my playgroup. I made a screenshot and had my friends recommend it, I was overwhelmed with friend requests. If you build it they will come, you just have to find a way to get it out there for people to see. Making it look tasty is good, but its more important that it gets out there for people to see.
Play Hard Start to Finish
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

Randy 355
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
Useful information indeed! Getting your maps out there can truly be difficult, but I have had my fair share of friends help me along the way. I do remember a particular instance of you guys here at RP helping Cyberdyne make the front page on ForgeHub. And I am still grateful for that! Not to mention the help you all gave me on Deadwalk and Powerless for MM. So, once again, thank you RP.

That said, I love the irony in the first read. Keep it up, Godly. ;)

Something I don't do enough, however, is give feedback on each playtest I participate in. I participate in verbal feedback when it is an option on customs, but I almost never go to their threads and give them further analysis. I plan to change this. Especially now. I don't know how this challenge is going to pan out, but I would very much like to give you guys ideas and feedback for your maps. I would especially want to if we could get a playtest together soon.

In fact, is anybody ready to test on Reach yet, other than me?
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

external memory
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
Design gets social (social is for casuals).

Seriously, though, sincerity does seem to be the key to all these categories and more.

Being sincere with yourself: what your goals are, how far you want to take your work through the wringer, what your motives are with a design. Or being sincere with others as far as their work, whether you're interested in their idea or not and whether it works for you on whatever level, being sincere about other people's behavior, and keeping your lines and standards consistent but flexible enough to understand what people are trying to do or say. Then there's the overlap of communicating your work to others, where sincerity with yourself and with others intersect.

In other words Investment is all about being sincere with yourself; you choose your level of involvement in your passions and set your own goals. Nurturing is all about others, valuing those whose opinion, time and camaraderie is important to you through your actions. The rest are in both spheres but they all overlap. It's not necessary to even divide the sphere of awareness or sincerity into these 5 areas, but think about them all more holistically in terms of your place and motive in any community online or IRL.
EXEM
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

AtlasisShruggin
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
GodlyPerfection wrote
AtlasisShruggin wrote
Valiant Outcast wrote
 why did you use "Finally" twice when neither of them were final?
This is an example of how not to build your reputation. This could be easily compared to a forger who comments on nothing but the aesthetics of a map from a screenshot they see online, rather than paying attention to design and giving quality feedback. Nitpicking grammar doesn't make me think of you as a superior intellect. It makes me find you annoying.

To answer your question, I used finally twice because I believed while writing that I was finishing my post with a final thought both times. I did not go back to edit my response. Satisfied?

FINALLY, next time you read a post, please pay attention to the substance of the writing, rather than the picking apart the grammar. Then we can ENGAGE in a conversation about the topic, and not worry about my use of vocabulary.

But you see you are doing the same in return and nitpicking his response. Perhaps he was just curious. "It makes me find you annoying" is no way to build a rep either. Rather than being offended, it is crucial to reply in a way in which you act as if the person was just being curious rather than attacking you. It helps avoid needless arguing and offense. Because the kind of reaction displayed above is definitely not how you should ever respond. Always think twice about how you talk to people and how you would feel if you were to read a response like that from them.

Thank you Atlas for that fine demonstration. ;) This is an opportunity to learn from one another... take it as one. :)


Valiant Outcast wrote
Actually I had nothing against it.
It just struck me as funny.

If you were offended I apologize.
This is definitely a great example on how to reply to something after causing a ruckus rather than retaliating harshly. Well played Valiant. ;)
Alright, finally home so I can respond to this ;) 'cracks knuckles'

First off let me say that I was in no way offended or would ever judge someone off one interaction online. I was snippy, because as we all know their is a form of trolling referred to as being a 'grammar nazi." This reduces a persons view point to the skill in which he presents it. I was annoyed and responded in an annoyed manner.

So here's a question I'd like to pose... Should we always be polite?

This becomes tricky because while we should treat others with respect we still have to present our own personal expectations to others and if we are part of a community and in a position to speak for the community we also have to state a communities expectations as well.

So why is this important? Because if we're are always polite and don't bring up the things that annoy us, the offense can be repeated without the knowledge that what they are doing is annoying or offensive. This isn't healthy for any relationship or community.

Let me use an example where I was in the wrong. During a testing lobby of Godly's we pointed out that an area of his map was broken. After it was pointed out, I encouraged my team the very next game to use the exploit to win. After the game, Godly explained to me in an annoyed tone that it was poor conduct to exploit something that had already been pointed out because he couldn't see how the rest of the map played. He was clearly right and I was clearly in the wrong. He had to be firm and talk down to me so that I would know what I had done was unacceptable and set his personal expectations for his lobbies. If he hadn't done this and I continued to do what I was doing Godly would have only grown more angry and the situation could have escalated. Instead he chose to end the behavior by dealing with me in the way he did.

Now for an example of where personal expectations can conflict with a communities expectations. A while back I used to be an active member of Forgehub. I grew tired of seeing the moderations that were happening and the suppression of true artistic nurturing. I called them out on it, and compared them to SOPA. Was this harsh? Absolutely, but sometimes it is important to be harsh to insure that your point is getting across. They sent me a pm describing how I was wrong and they disagreed with everything that SOPA was trying to accomplish.... And then they moderated my post. I then re-edited my post to pose this question to them... "How can you claim to not be like SOPA after moderating my post, which broke no forum rules. Only pointed out how you were suppressing free speech?" After this I left the site. My personal expectations did not match up with the communities expectations, so it was best that I remove myself from the situation.

It's important to keep this sentiment in mind.

"You are a product of your environment. So choose the environment that will best develop you toward your objective. Analyze your life in terms of its environment. Are the things around you helping you toward success - or are they holding you back?"

Making your own personal expectations know is not a bad thing. I expect others to read what I write and judge it on the content, not on my rushed grammar. Valiant knows this now and apologized, and from his response, I don't expect it will happen again. He knows where I find an annoyance in this and we can move forward in helping each other be the best forgers we can be.

I have a lot of respect for Valiant because of his response, and if he is here to make friends so he can improve his skills as a forger and find lobbies to test his maps, I will be glad to help him, and in turn I hope he will help me. But it is sometimes important to let others know what we expect of them in their dealings with us.

Two quick random observations....

Only on RP could this become a conversation and not a flame war :P

This is indeed the perfect thread for all of this to happen in. I look forward to responses and a good discussion.

"This dread born of risk is not the opposite of joy, or even of quiet activity and calm enjoyment. It transcends such oppositions and lives in secret communion with the serene and gentle yearnings of creativity."
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

ForgedExodus
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
I've been spared most of the advertising problems, since I have not yet had the oppurtunity to advertise :P But I agree completely with all that was said. I'd say that 10 friends on my friends list are not involved, but more everyday are (Since The forge community seems to like people on their friends list who do what they do, and are happy to add me for feedback and vice versa.) Whether it is this lovely site, or Waypoint, or even Youtube at times, You can find potential map makers and testers or just good friends who want to be part of something.

 
Breaking the Limits, Without Breaking the Rules.
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

P1 Mario
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
Hmm, I don't have a lot of friends in this community... Randy is really the only one, and that's because we currently attend to the same college.

Obviously, I hope to fix this situation!

I've been in a few testing sessions with you guys, but never with a mic, as I was visiting Mr. 355.  So question... do we have a bulletin board of some kind - like a place to post play session times and such?  I think it'd be helpful for new members (such as myself) who don't have you all on our friend lists to get to know everybody.  Alternatively, if I made such a thread, where would it go, spam?
~Ask not why I get to be Player 1.
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

external memory
This post was updated on .
P1 Mario wrote
Hmm, I don't have a lot of friends in this community... Randy is really the only one, and that's because we currently attend to the same college.

Obviously, I hope to fix this situation!

I've been in a few testing sessions with you guys, but never with a mic, as I was visiting Mr. 355.  So question... do we have a bulletin board of some kind - like a place to post play session times and such?  I think it'd be helpful for new members (such as myself) who don't have you all on our friend lists to get to know everybody.  Alternatively, if I made such a thread, where would it go, spam?
No bulletin board, RP for customs generally posts in the Halo forum, under Community>Serious Discussion.

As far as friends list spaces, I'd add RP's directory gamertag, "A 01 PerfectGT" for now. I think it's still maintained?
A bunch of RP and non RP people, forgers and customs buddies alike are on that friends list. You can use the tag's friends list to invite people that aren't on yours but are/were associated with RP map forging and testing.

Plan a custom game night or session of serious testing several maps, not just yours, just as long as it's not specific to just your map and you're not promoting your map in the Halo discussion  forum, otherwise pretty informal.

Also, if you want more specific attention and help from people in-game, soliciting in your pre-production thread is another option. They're like mini-portfolios, except just for design ideas for this project. Promote your map and plan dedicated tests in the Pre-Production subforum all you want, I'd say.
EXEM
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

Valiant Outcast
In reply to this post by AtlasisShruggin
AtlasisShruggin wrote
GodlyPerfection wrote
AtlasisShruggin wrote
Valiant Outcast wrote
 why did you use "Finally" twice when neither of them were final?
This is an example of how not to build your reputation. This could be easily compared to a forger who comments on nothing but the aesthetics of a map from a screenshot they see online, rather than paying attention to design and giving quality feedback. Nitpicking grammar doesn't make me think of you as a superior intellect. It makes me find you annoying.

To answer your question, I used finally twice because I believed while writing that I was finishing my post with a final thought both times. I did not go back to edit my response. Satisfied?

FINALLY, next time you read a post, please pay attention to the substance of the writing, rather than the picking apart the grammar. Then we can ENGAGE in a conversation about the topic, and not worry about my use of vocabulary.

But you see you are doing the same in return and nitpicking his response. Perhaps he was just curious. "It makes me find you annoying" is no way to build a rep either. Rather than being offended, it is crucial to reply in a way in which you act as if the person was just being curious rather than attacking you. It helps avoid needless arguing and offense. Because the kind of reaction displayed above is definitely not how you should ever respond. Always think twice about how you talk to people and how you would feel if you were to read a response like that from them.

Thank you Atlas for that fine demonstration. ;) This is an opportunity to learn from one another... take it as one. :)


Valiant Outcast wrote
Actually I had nothing against it.
It just struck me as funny.

If you were offended I apologize.
This is definitely a great example on how to reply to something after causing a ruckus rather than retaliating harshly. Well played Valiant. ;)
Alright, finally home so I can respond to this ;) 'cracks knuckles'

First off let me say that I was in no way offended or would ever judge someone off one interaction online. I was snippy, because as we all know their is a form of trolling referred to as being a 'grammar nazi." This reduces a persons view point to the skill in which he presents it. I was annoyed and responded in an annoyed manner.

So here's a question I'd like to pose... Should we always be polite?

This becomes tricky because while we should treat others with respect we still have to present our own personal expectations to others and if we are part of a community and in a position to speak for the community we also have to state a communities expectations as well.

So why is this important? Because if we're are always polite and don't bring up the things that annoy us, the offense can be repeated without the knowledge that what they are doing is annoying or offensive. This isn't healthy for any relationship or community.

Let me use an example where I was in the wrong. During a testing lobby of Godly's we pointed out that an area of his map was broken. After it was pointed out, I encouraged my team the very next game to use the exploit to win. After the game, Godly explained to me in an annoyed tone that it was poor conduct to exploit something that had already been pointed out because he couldn't see how the rest of the map played. He was clearly right and I was clearly in the wrong. He had to be firm and talk down to me so that I would know what I had done was unacceptable and set his personal expectations for his lobbies. If he hadn't done this and I continued to do what I was doing Godly would have only grown more angry and the situation could have escalated. Instead he chose to end the behavior by dealing with me in the way he did.

Now for an example of where personal expectations can conflict with a communities expectations. A while back I used to be an active member of Forgehub. I grew tired of seeing the moderations that were happening and the suppression of true artistic nurturing. I called them out on it, and compared them to SOPA. Was this harsh? Absolutely, but sometimes it is important to be harsh to insure that your point is getting across. They sent me a pm describing how I was wrong and they disagreed with everything that SOPA was trying to accomplish.... And then they moderated my post. I then re-edited my post to pose this question to them... "How can you claim to not be like SOPA after moderating my post, which broke no forum rules. Only pointed out how you were suppressing free speech?" After this I left the site. My personal expectations did not match up with the communities expectations, so it was best that I remove myself from the situation.

It's important to keep this sentiment in mind.

"You are a product of your environment. So choose the environment that will best develop you toward your objective. Analyze your life in terms of its environment. Are the things around you helping you toward success - or are they holding you back?"

Making your own personal expectations know is not a bad thing. I expect others to read what I write and judge it on the content, not on my rushed grammar. Valiant knows this now and apologized, and from his response, I don't expect it will happen again. He knows where I find an annoyance in this and we can move forward in helping each other be the best forgers we can be.

I have a lot of respect for Valiant because of his response, and if he is here to make friends so he can improve his skills as a forger and find lobbies to test his maps, I will be glad to help him, and in turn I hope he will help me. But it is sometimes important to let others know what we expect of them in their dealings with us.

Two quick random observations....

Only on RP could this become a conversation and not a flame war :P

This is indeed the perfect thread for all of this to happen in. I look forward to responses and a good discussion.
I have to say that I agree.
I would add that what I actually learned is to not assume how something that you say will be interpreted.
In the case which started this discussion, (which is a perfect example for the situation) I posted a comment (though maybe not a well-worded one) about the irony of Atlas's accidental misuse of the word "final", assuming he would take it as a joke and probably laugh at it. It somehow slipped my mind that it could actually be taken any other way.

So let my example be a warning to you, RP. Don't assume someones motive, interpretations, or current attitude (which will always affect their interpretation and always be susceptible to change. And don't overlook any possible ones either.
I nearly made someone hate me from our first meeting, and on a site like this, that is practically a death sentence, especially if that someone is as skilled of a forger as Atlas.
So be careful.

Also I need to warn you all that I have a warped sense of humor. For instance, when Atlas said "flame war", this is what I thought:



I am neither the Judge or His jury; only His witness.
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

InnerSandman
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
None of my friends are in this competition, expect for you Godly, and none of them have joined. I spend most of my time on the lovely site of XForgery and a little bit on HaloUnity. I do care for the community, but I've been busy lately so I can't dedicate time to improve the site.
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

Solo XIII
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by GodlyPerfection
On the topic of advertising your maps:

I feel that creating a solid, respectable public image is key -- You want people to take you seriously. Put an appropriate amount of time and thought into your posts, and don't rely on an unreasonable amount of effort from your peers. Nothing is worse than a thread without pictures, as people will immediately conclude that you are not serious about your project. If you can't take the time out of your day to make a proper post, what's to say you are willing to put in the necessary time to create a well-balanced, aesthetically-pleasing design?

It's also important to get yourself out there. If you are relatively unknown, you have to be proactive. Send friend requests, offer play-testing, and give constructive feedback. People are going to respect you more and give more attention to your projects if you have a good reputation.

--

I'm primarily an MLG forger, although with the dropping of Halo Reach from the pro circuit, we as a community have moved onward to TheHaloCouncil. So far, I have been unsuccessful in convincing anyone to join in with this contest. I think the relocation to another forum is difficult, and there is a lot of distrust in the mechanics behind this contest. Some would say that it is employing an abusable system, where community presence and making friends is almost paramount to actually producing a quality piece of work.

My belief is that -- while the voting system for this contest is not perfect -- it does encourage community participation, fore-thought, planning, and testing. The production and voting process is potentially flawed, but I still expect to see many quality maps arise out of the process. If I have to jump through hoops to help further a better matchmaking experience in H4, I'm willing to do it.

I haven't taken a particularly active duty in this community, and I haven't exactly sent out a plethora of friend requests. In fact, I am having trouble spending time on Halo at all right now. It's just not very fun. However, I have gotten my interest in designing back, and my offer still remains if anyone wants to do a rundown on Sketchup. I'd like to group up, if you don't mind, so I don't have to go over the same things with several different parties.
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Re: Resource #11 [10/16]

AtlasisShruggin
Solo XIII wrote
I'm primarily an MLG forger, although with the dropping of Halo Reach from the pro circuit, we as a community have moved onward to TheHaloCouncil. So far, I have been unsuccessful in convincing anyone to join in with this contest. I think the relocation to another forum is difficult, and there is a lot of distrust in the mechanics behind this contest. Some would say that it is employing an abusable system, where community presence and making friends is almost paramount to actually producing a quality piece of work.
Community presence and making friends isn't paramount to creating a quality map, but it is essential to driving the success of it. I have very little connection into the mlg community beyond a few friends who act as bridges into the community. However, I have heard that the politics of getting a map onto the circuit is dependent on your popularity and who you are friends with in the mlg community. There are a lot of good lessons to be learned here, and despite how the end result will be determined, the level design resources have been very well done and have been incredibly helpful. The point of the competition is to improve your skills as a forger and your ability to get your map out there. Maybe concentrating on the process would help you convince some more of your friends to join the contest. And isn't that the point anyway? Godly is trying to help us value and work on our own convincing skills to get others involved in what we are building/doing.
"This dread born of risk is not the opposite of joy, or even of quiet activity and calm enjoyment. It transcends such oppositions and lives in secret communion with the serene and gentle yearnings of creativity."
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